Heart of Ancient Greece

Acropolis Museum

The Acropolis Museum is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece.

Byzantine and Christian Museum

It was founded in 1914, and houses more than 25,000 exhibits with rare collections of pictures, scriptures, frescoes, pottery, fabrics, manuscripts, and copies of artifacts from the 3rd century AD to the Late Middle Ages. It is one of the most important museums in the world in Byzantine Art. In June 2004, in time for its 90th anniversary and the 2004 Athens Olympics, the museum reopened to the public after an extensive renovation and the addition of another wing.

Roman Agora

The Ancient Agora of Athens is the largely green area in between Monastiraki and the Acropolis, one of the few archaeological sites in the world that has a train running through it. Agora means marketplace and the scattered piles of rocks and foundational walls are what is left of the stalls, buildings and shrines that were the center of life in ancient Athens where Socrates, Pericles, Plato and the rest of those guys once walked, talked and bought fistikia and pasetempo.

Syntagma Square

Syntagma Square is the most important square of modern Athens from both a historical and social point of view, at the heart of commercial activity and Greek politics. The name Syntagma

 alone also refers to the neighbourhood surrounding the square.

Plaka

In the shadow of the Acropolis and its ancient temples, hillside Plaka has a village feel, with narrow cobblestone streets lined with tiny shops selling jewelry, clothes and local ceramics. Sidewalk cafes and family-run tavernas stay open until late, and Cine Paris shows classic movies al fresco. Nearby, the whitewashed homes of the Anafiotika neighborhood give the small enclave a Greek-island vibe.

The Parthenon in Athens is the most famous surviving building of Ancient Greece and one of the most famous buildings in the world.

The Parthenon has stood atop the Acropolis of Athens for nearly 2,500 years and was built to give thanks to Athena, the city’s patron goddess, for the salvation of

Parthenon

Athens and Greece in the Persian Wars. The building was officially called the Temple of Athena the Virgin; “Parthenon” comes from the Greek word parthenos, “virgin.”

Throughout its long life, the Parthenon has functioned most importantly as a Greek temple, but has also been a treasury, a fortress, a church, and a mosque. Today, it is one of the most recognizable icons and popular tourist attractions in the world.

Theatre of Dionysus

The Theatre of Dionysus Eleuthereus is a major theatre in Athens, considered to be the world’s first theatre, built at the foot of the Athenian Acropolis.

It was in this theatre that the plays of Eschyles, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes were immortalized.

Athens and Greece in the Persian Wars. The building was officially called the Temple of Athena the Virgin; “Parthenon” comes from the Greek word parthenos, “virgin.”

Throughout its long life, the Parthenon has functioned most importantly as a Greek temple, but has also been a treasury, a fortress, a church, and a mosque. Today, it is one of the most recognizable icons and popular tourist attractions in the world.

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